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Scott Luebke

 

Teaching since 1995, Scott has taught 1,000+ golf lessons (private, semi-private, group).  Scott has served as the PGA Head Professional at MetroWest Golf Club and the PGA Director of Golf at Hunter’s Creek Golf Club prior to his role as President of Golf Orlando Florida.

Scott’s philosophy on the golf swing is to keep it simple and focus on the fundamentals of grip, alignment, posture, balance and swing plane. The proper setup is essential to execute a balanced, athletic, efficient swing.  There is not "one swing type" for all golfers. Create the motion, shape the motion, and repeat the swinging motion. Efficiency of motion is the overall goal. With a focus on the full swing, short game, and mental game, Scott’s goal is to teach people to play better golf.

6 results - showing 1 - 6  
 
 
Golf Drill: Putting Distance Control
Scott Luebke   March 16, 2014  

Distance and direction are the two variables for putting success.  Direction is important for shorter putts.  Distance control is vitally important for longer putts.  Inconsistent distance control leads to the majority of 3-putts for golfers off all skill levels.

Are you having trouble with distance control on the putting surface?  If so, use the following helpful drill to improve your distance control and putting touch.  Take your normal set up and putt a golf ball from various distances to a target or hole.  Start off the drill from the shorter distances: 1 foot, 2 feet, 3 feet, 4 feet, 5 feet, and 6 feet.

Now, do the same from 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 feet.  Note: we are incrementally increasing distances.

Scott Luebke   February 27, 2014  

In previous golf lessons I discussed how to hit a golf ball from an uphill lie and how to hit a golf ball from a sidehill lie with the ball below your feet.  Here is a golf lesson on how to hit a golf ball from a downhill lie. 

When you face a downhill lie, the ball lies below your feet.  The address position relating to the ball and clubhead positions should be the same as a level lie.  Ball position should be in the center of your stance.  Because of the downhill lie, your body will need to bend more at the hips to reach the ball.

Because the excessive bending is uncomfortable when finishing your backswing, golfers have a tendency to straighten their posture similar to a level lie.  The straightening of the posture results in thin shots and in some cases…topping the ball.  To alleviate this problem, widen your stance slightly.  The wider stance will make it easier to reach the ball.

Scott Luebke   February 16, 2014  


In our previous golf lesson article I discussed how to hit a golf ball off an uphill lie.  Hopefully, you had a chance to practice hitting balls off the uphill lie.  Now, I will discuss how to hit a golf ball from a sidehill lie with the ball below the feet.

When you face this type of sidehill lie, the ball lies below your feet.  The address position relating to the ball and clubhead positions should be the same as a level lie.  Ball position should be in the center of your stance.  Because of the sidehill lie, your body will need to bend more at the hips to reach the ball.

Scott Luebke   February 02, 2014  

The uphill lie and stance can be confusing for golfers.  The awkward lie angle naturally changes the swing plane.  Here’s a good method to hit a golf ball off an uphill lie with better precision.

When you face an uphill lie, the golf ball lies above your feet.  The address position relating to the ball and clubhead positions should be the same as a level lie.  Ball position should be in the center of your stance.  Because of the hill, your body will be in a straighter or more erect position.  Grip down on the club.  By gripping down on the club you can be closer to the ball and the steepness of the hill grade is reduced.

Golf Grip: How to Grip a Golf Club
Scott Luebke   January 23, 2014  

The golf grip is a point of confusion for many beginning, novice and high handicap golfers. How to grip a golf club is a question students have asked me many times on the lesson tee.

A proper grip is essential to playing good golf consistently.  The hands are the only part of your body that touch the golf club to provide a "connection".  Your golf grip will influence the clubface angle at impact and how fast you are able to swing the club. 

A good grip helps return the clubhead square to the ball at impact without hindering the natural centrifugal force generated by the swinging of the golf club.   As the late Tommy Armour stated, “The basic factor in all good golf is the grip.  Get it right and all other progress follows”.

Throughout my years of golf instruction, I have taken a fundamental, simplistic approach to the golf swing. For a proper golf grip, I stress the importance of the three P's.  Placement, pressure and precision.

Better Balance to Improve Your Golf Swing
Scott Luebke   April 22, 2013  

The key to consistent ball striking is balance.  Balance, whether good or bad, affects your golf swing in numerous ways.  If you improve your balance, you will hit a higher percentage of straighter and longer golf shots.  Proper balance is a skill that can be developed and should be practiced on a continual basis.

One of the best balance drills is not golf specific, but can have a dramatic impact on your golf swing.  Practice standing on one foot for as long as you can.  Start by standing with your weight on your right foot.  Then, stand with your weight on your left foot.  You might be surprised with the difficulty of this seemingly simple exercise.  Begin with a short goal of 20-25 seconds on each foot and try to improve your times daily.

6 results - showing 1 - 6  
 
 

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